Dunce, Diseased and Depraved : Of “rights” and secular stupidity.

 

“Fools  rush in where  wise men never go”

The  following  are  contrasting  reports on  HIV in two  of  the most  affected  populations; Men who have Sex with  Men (MSM)  and  the populations  of  some  countries  in Sub Saharan Africa.

In its 2010 Global  Report  UNAIDS reported  that  22  countries  in Sub Saharan African had  more  than  a  25% decrease in  new  HIV  cases  between  2001  and  2009 .

This  is to  be  contrasted  with  reports  out  of  the Centers  for  Disease  Control  in  the  USA  which  indicates  in its  2012  report  that  new  HIV  cases  had increased  by  22% among  young MSMs  in  the United  States . 

Despite  this alarming  statistic  MSM  and  their  supporters  in the secular  community  are claiming  ” rights”  to fisting, felching, rimming, farming, scat, anal penetration, chariot racing, jackhammering  etc  whilst  calling  critics  of  the  life style bigots, haters  and  homophobes

UNAIDS  GLOBAL  REPORT

CHAPTER 2 | EPIDEMIC UPDATE

EPIDEMIC UPDATE

THE OVERALL GROWTH OF THE GLOBAL AIDS EPIDEMIC APPEARS TO
HAVE STABILIZED. THE ANNUAL NUMBER OF NEW HIV INFECTIONS
HAS BEEN STEADILY DECLINING SINCE THE LATE 1990S AND THERE ARE
FEWER AIDS-RELATED DEATHS DUE TO THE SIGNIFICANT SCALE UP OF
ANTIRETROVIRAL THERAPY OVER THE PAST FEW YEARS. ALTHOUGH
THE NUMBER OF NEW INFECTIONS HAS BEEN FALLING, LEVELS OF
NEW INFECTIONS OVERALL ARE STILL HIGH, AND WITH SIGNIFICANT
REDUCTIONS IN MORTALITY THE NUMBER OF PEOPLE LIVING WITH HIV
WORLDWIDE HAS INCREASED

New HIV infections are declining
In 2009, there were an estimated 2.6 million [2.3 million–2.8 million] people
who became newly infected with HIV. Th is is nearly one fi ft h (19%) fewer than
the 3.1 million [2.9 million–3.4 million] people newly infected in 1999, and
more than one fi ft h (21%) fewer than the estimated 3.2 million [3.0 million–3.5
million] in 1997, the year in which annual new infections peaked (Figure 2.1).
In 33 countries, the HIV incidence has fallen by more than 25% between 2001
and 2009 (Figure. 2.2); 22 of these countries are in sub-Saharan Africa. In sub-
Saharan Africa, where the majority of new HIV infections continue to occur,
an estimated 1.8 million [1.6 million–2.0 million] people became infected in
2009; considerably lower than the estimated 2.2 million [1.9 million–2.4 million]
people in sub-Saharan Africa newly infected with HIV in 2001. Th is
trend refl ects a combination of factors, including th

CDC Fact  Sheet : New  HIV Infections  in the United  States

The latest CDC estimates of new HIV infections (HIV incidence) in the United States indicate that HIV remains a serious health problem, with an estimated 47,500 people becoming newly infected with the virus in the United States in 20101. The data are included in a new CDC report, Estimated HIV incidence among adults and adolescents in the United States, 2007–2010*, which includes new HIV incidence estimates for 2010 and updates previously published estimates for 2007 through 20092. HIV incidence has remained relatively stable at about 50,000 infections per year since the mid-1990s3. According to the new analysis, there were 53,200 infections in 2007; 47,500 in 2008; 45,000 in 2009; and 47,500 in 2010. Certain groups, including African Americans, Latinos, and gay and bisexual men of all races/ethnicities, continue to be disproportionately affected by HIV. The new analysis also finds two noteworthy trends among heavily affected populations: early signs of an encouraging decrease in new HIV infections among black women (21 percent decrease between 2008 and 2010**), and a troubling and continuing increase in new infections among young gay and bisexual men (22 percent increase over the same time period).

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