Dunce and Diseased. Is the moral relativism / nihilism of secular thought the engine of the HIV pandemic ?

Men having Sex with Men cannot  be  a  logical  construct  in the Christian theistic worldview.

It  can  however  be  accepted  as “normal  and positive”  in a secular / atheistic  world view which rejects  design and a transcendent  morality.

Secular  morality must  also  champion the  autonomy  of  the individual to  do  whatever gives  him or  her  pleasure.

Further  in the  utilitarian approach  to the common  good all good  are  equivalent  i.e  the  good  produced  by  scat  is  equivalent  to  any deed  performed  for  charity.

Logically  in utilitarianism the  value  of  the  good  of  100 persons pursuing scat  will  outweigh  the  value  of  the  good  of  5 persons doing  charitable  work.

In giving  ” intellectual”   support  to   the  intimate  activities  of  Men who  have Sex with Men the  secular  worldview  may  well  be  the  ultimate  driving  force  behind  the HIV / AIDS  pandemic

http://www.phac-aspc.gc.ca/aids-sida/publication/survreport/estimat2011-eng.php

Background

The Public Health Agency of Canada’s (PHAC) Centre for Communicable Disease and Infection Control (CCDIC) produces national HIV and AIDS surveillance reports annually. However, HIV and AIDS surveillance data do not include individuals who are untested and undiagnosed. Therefore, modelling and additional sources of information are required to produce the estimates that describe the epidemic among all Canadians living with HIV, both diagnosed and undiagnosed.

Estimating the number of people living with HIV is a task undertaken around the world to monitor the HIV epidemic, to guide planning for disease prevention and to help assess the effectiveness of prevention programs. PHAC/CCDIC produces two types of estimates as part of its mandate to monitor HIV/AIDS trends in Canada: prevalence, the number of people living with HIV (including AIDS), and incidence, the number of new infections in a one-year period. These estimates guide the work done by PHAC and other federal departments under the Federal Initiative to Address HIV/AIDS in Canada.

PHAC/CCDIC has produced national HIV estimates for Canada every three years since 1996. Estimates published in this report replace all previous estimates that we have published concerning HIV prevalence and incidence in Canada because new data and methods have allowed an improved analysis of the epidemic and more reliable estimates.

Estimate of the number of people living with HIV at the end of 2011

HIV/AIDS remains an issue of concern for Canada. The number of people living with HIV (including AIDS) continues to rise, from an estimated 64,000 in 2008 to 71,300 in 2011 (an 11.4% increase) (Table 1, Figure 1). The increase in the number of people living with HIV is due to the fact that new infections continue at a not insignificant rate which is greater than HIV-related deaths, as new treatments have improved survival. The estimated prevalence rate in Canada in 2011 was 208.0 per 100,000 population (range: 171.0-245.1 per 100,000 population). Nearly half (46.7%) of those living with HIV were men who have sex with men (MSM). Those who acquired their infection through heterosexual contact and were not from an HIV-endemic region comprised the next largest group (17.6%), followed by those who acquired their infection through injection drug use (IDU) (16.9%) and those exposed through heterosexual contact and were also from an HIV-endemic region (14.9%).

An estimated 6,380 (5,160 to 7,600) Aboriginal people were living with HIV (including AIDS) in Canada at the end of 2011 (8.9% of all prevalent HIV infections) which represents an increase of 17.3% from the 2008 estimate of 5,440 (4,380 to 6,500; 8.5% of all prevalent infections in 2008). The estimated prevalence rate among Aboriginal people in Canada in 2011 was 544.0 per 100,000 population (range: 440.0-648.0 per 100,000 population).

At the end of 2011, there were an estimated 16,600 (13,200-20,000) women living with HIV (including AIDS) in Canada, accounting for 23.3% of the national total. This represents a 12.6% increase compared to the estimated 14,740 (11,980-17,500) for 2008, which accounted for 23.0% of the national total that year.

Estimate of the number of new HIV infections in 2011

Although estimates of the number of new HIV infections are uncertain, the number of new infections in 2011 was estimated at 3,175 (range between 2,250 and 4,100) which was about the same as or slightly fewer than the estimate in 2008 (3,335; range of 2,370 to 4,300) (Table 2, Figure 2). In terms of exposure category, MSM continued to comprise the greatest proportion (46.6%) of new infections in 2011, which was slightly higher than the proportion they comprised in 2008 (44.1%). In 2011, the proportion of new infections among IDU was lower than in 2008 (13.7% compared to 16.9%). The proportion of new infections attributed to the heterosexual/non-endemic and heterosexual/endemic exposure categories were about the same in 2011 compared to 2008 (20.3% vs 20.1% and 16.9% vs 16.2%, respectively) (Figure 3).

People from countries where HIV is endemic continue to be over-represented in Canada’s HIV epidemic. An estimated 535 new infections were attributed to the heterosexual/endemic exposure category in 2011 (range of 370 to 700). This category accounted for 16.9% of new infections in Canada in 2011 while approximately 2.2% of the Canadian population were born in an HIV-endemic country according to the 2006 Census. Therefore, the estimated new infection rate among people from countries where HIV is endemic was 9.0 times higher than among other Canadians.

Aboriginal people also continue to be over-represented in the HIV epidemic in Canada. An estimated 390 (280 to 500) new HIV infections occurred in Aboriginal people in 2011 (12.2% of all new infections), slightly fewer than the 420 (290 to 550) new infections in 2008 (12.6% of all new infections in 2008). However, the proportion for 2011 is still much higher than the proportion of Aboriginal people in the general Canadian population, which was 3.8% according to the 2006 Census. The overall new infection rate among Aboriginal people was 3.5 times higher than among the non-Aboriginal population in 2011. Among Aboriginal people, the exposure category distribution for new HIV infections in 2011 was 58.1% IDU, 30.2% heterosexual, 8.5% MSM and 3.1% MSM-IDU. This compares to the following distributions for this population in 2008: 63.4% IDU, 28.3% heterosexual, 6.0% MSM and 2.4% MSM-IDU.

There were an estimated 755 (510 to 1,000) new HIV infections among women in Canada in 2011, while the corresponding figure for 2008 was 865 (630 to 1,100). The proportion of all new infections among women was also slightly lower in 2011 compared to 2008 (23.8% vs. 25.9%). With respect to exposure category, a slightly lower proportion of new infections among women was attributed to IDU in 2011 compared to 2008 (23.4% versus 28.3%), whereas a slightly higher proportion was attributed to the heterosexual exposure category (endemic and non-endemic combined) (76.6% in 2011 compared to 71.7% in 2008).

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