Another institution formed to claim that buggery, fisting, felching, farming, scat etc are human rights ?

”  there  are  good  antecedents  to   suggest  that the  most  important  role  those  behind  the  formation of  the  Jamaica  Human Rights Institute  will  have  it  play  is  to  claim  that  there  are  human  rights  to  buggery, scat, farming, chariot racing, jack hammering  etc”

…… Testifyingtotruth…..

It  is  almost  certain that  the  substantial  consideration  for  this  newly  formed  institute  is  the  so-called  privacy  rights  of  moral nihilists  and  sexual  anarchists  to  engage  in fisting, felching, rimming, farming, scat, chariot racing, jack hammering  etc

Jamaicans  need  to  be  vigilante  and  not  allow  this  Institute  to  undermine  their  rights  to freedom  of  speech, freedom of  conscience, freedom of religion and  parental rights to tell  their  children what  they consider  to  be  right and  wrong by the Institute  making  these  fundamental  rights  secondary  to  so –  called  ” sexual  rights”.

http://www.hardcell.org.uk/en/playroom/felching/

FELCHING Felching / Things to know

What is felching? Felching is sucking (usually your own) cum out of someone’s arse, possibly with a straw. It may then include passing the spunk from mouth to mouth.

What’s the attraction? Many of us are drawn towards tasting or swallowing cum (our own or others). It can mean taking into the body something seen as valued and potent.

Felching can also signify the end of the sex act. This meaning is even stronger if the cum’s been inside the other man as it’s a strong sign of two men joining together in a very intimate, ‘no limits’ way. A strong, ‘piggy’ erotic charge comes from breaking the taboos around cleanliness and health that come with taking into your mouth something that’s been up another man’s arse.

Last review: 25/09/2014

Next review: 31/09/2017

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    http://jis.gov.jm/jamaica-takes-steps-establish-national-human-rights-institution/

golding-rights-640x425

The Government has started dialogue with the Commonwealth Secretariat for the establishment of a National Human Rights Institution (NHRI) compliant with the Paris Principles.

The Paris Principles are a set of guiding standards which form the framework for the establishment of NHRIs. These principles were drafted at an international workshop in Paris, France in 1991, and were adopted by the United Nations General Assembly in 1993.

Minister of Justice, Senator the Hon. Mark Golding, delivering the keynote address at the first of a two-day session, on July 22, welcomed the discussion on how Jamaica can establish an effective and sustainable NHRI.

“This dialogue will provide us with a useful opportunity to learn more about the features and role of National Human Rights Institutions, and we can begin the process of considering the range of choices that exist as to the type of institution that would best fit our country’s needs,” he said.

The Minister also affirmed the Government’s commitment to the human rights treaties, of which Jamaica is a signatory. “At meetings of the Commonwealth Heads of Governments held in 2012 and 2013, Jamaica joined with other governments which make up the Commonwealth to renew and reaffirm the commitments given under these international agreements, and agreed to support the establishment and strengthening of National Human Rights Institutions,” Senator Golding said.

Acting Head of Human Rights, Commonwealth Secretariat, Karen McKenzie, who also addressed the group of stakeholders, highlighted the significance of the discourse. “The importance of having a dialogue is part of the journey that the Commonwealth Secretariat has when a government indicates an intention for the establishment of an NHRI. Such a dialogue aims at ensuring that governments, ministries, senior officials, the judiciary, electoral commission and other government institutions all have the same understanding and they have been clarified on the international framework for the establishment of a NHRI,” she said.

The Commonwealth Secretariat, as part of its support, will provide technical support to the Jamaican Government. “Our assistance will include helping and supporting the Government to develop legislation or review current legislation. We will also want to facilitate a national stakeholder conference where we would invite all the relevant stakeholders to participate and voice their opinions,” Ms. McKenzie said. She also lauded the Government for the steps it has taken to promote human rights. Pointing to the establishment of the Independent Commission of Investigations (INDECOM), the justice sector reform and the Disabilities Act that is currently before Parliament, she said “we must celebrate and commend that which has been done and is being done.” More than 100 countries already have NHRIs. Of that figure, 21 of those countries are part of the Commonwealth and have accredited institutions.

Jamaica has done significant work in the area of Human Rights, beginning with the declaration of National Human Rights Year in 1968 by then Governor General, Sir Clifford Campbell. Since then Jamaica has ratified seven of the nine core international human rights treaties. A number of topics will be discussed over the two-day period, including the roles and responsibilities of NHRIs and the legal framework for the establishment of a Paris Principle compliant NHRI.

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